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Caroline Fairchild
Bloomberg|bloomberg.com
20- to 34-year-olds are renting apartments, cars and even clothing to save money and stay flexible.

The day Michael Anselmo signed a lease on his first apartment in New York City, he lost his job at Buck Consultants. He spent about 10 months struggling to pay rent with unemployment benefits. Two years later, he’s still hesitant to buy a home or even a road bike.

“Every decision that I have made since I lost my job has been colored by that insecurity I feel about the future,” said Anselmo, 28, who now rents an apartment in Austin, Texas, and works as a consultant for UnitedHealth Group. “Buying a house is just further out on the timeline for me than it used to be.”

Anselmo and many peers are wary about making large purchases after entering adulthood in the deepest recession and weakest recovery since World War II. read more »

 
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